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Other Roadside Signage Pacific Northwest

 

Del Mar Mobile Home Park
Grants Pass, OR
Photo courtesy Dave & Debra van Hulsteyn

Check out the roadside sign for the Del Mar Mobile Home Park in Grants Pass. Yes, those little characters atop the sign look like little doggies. 03-06

 

 

Hillman Minx
Cottage Grove, OR
Photo courtesy Dave & Debra van Hulsteyn

The Hillman Minx store features an old marquee, now missing its neon tubing for the lettering on the sign. 03-06

 

 

Prints Charming
Roseburg, OR
Photo courtesy Dave & Debra van Hulsteyn

Here's an interesting play on words. The Prints Charming sign proudly catches the attention of passersby with its interesting name. 03-06

 

 

Buy Here
Roseburg, OR
Photo courtesy Dave & Debra van Hulsteyn

Buy Here and Pay Here. At least that's what this sign demands in Roseburg, OR. 03-06

 

 

Apex
Roseburg, OR
Photo courtesy Dave & Debra van Hulsteyn

The Apex and its prominent and enlarged A on this large marquee dots the roadside landscape in the Oregon town of Roseburg. 03-06

 

 

 

Boans
Tacoma, WA
Photo courtesy Jim Zahniser

Those driving through Tacoma, WA looking to get a quick loan will be surprised when they do a double-take on this sign. Not sure what "boans" represents, but it sure looks like a loan place at first look. 11-08

 

 

Harkness Furniture
Tacoma, WA
Photo courtesy Jim Zahniser

The Harkness Furniture marquee in Tacoma features a well kept sign, complete with dual circular arrows. 11-08

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seattle Post-Intelligencer
Seattle, WA
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

The Seattle Post-Intelligencer is well known for its local newspaper, which remains an online product despite the paper side of the business being halted earlier in 2009. The paper is also very well known for a roadside icon that sticks in the memory of all that pass through the area whether on business or pleasure.

According to the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer globe, or "P-I" globe tops the statewide list of endangered properties. The P-I globe originally began rotating on November 9, 1948, then moved to its present location in 1986. The globe still spins today although P-I owner Hearst Corporation stopped the printing presses in March 2009 and remade the P-I into an online news company only. More information can be found in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer May 26 article. 05-09

 

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© Copyright 1998-2017 Syd Nagoshi. All rights reserved. No portion of this document may be reproduced, copied or revised without written permission of the author.